Bon Vivant: (n) a person having cultivated, refined, and sociable tastes especially with respect to food and drink.

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Why Wine?

Posted in: Bon Vivant, Drink Well, On the Road, Travel, Wine Tasting

I’m often asked why I’ve decided to make a career in wine and the answer, like many, is a circuitous one.  Not many people start their careers in wine, but almost everyone you ask will be able to point to one or two seminal experiences in their lives that changed the game, pointing them towards their eventual career.

My Dad introduced us to great food at an early age and we were permitted to enjoy a small glass of wine on special occasions. His favored tipple was- and remains- heavily oaked American chardonnay, and so that was my reference point for all wine from a young age.

My family has always believed in spending money on travel over material things- we’ve all got a serious case of wanderlust, and it’s often when I’m furthest from home that I feel the most myself.

When I was 16 we took a trip to Paris and the Loire Valley over Thanksgiving break.  There were as many Griswold type gaffes as there were outstanding moments on that trip.

My Dad isn’t the most patient of travelers, and teenage girls aren’t known for traveling light. At one point the four of us were separated, jet lagged on three different metro cars on the way to our hotel.  We eventually all made it in one piece, exhausted, angry and overburdened by our stuffed suitcases ill suited for the myriad stairs and cobblestones of Paris. My father was enjoying his second glass of wine in the lobby bar as if nothing was amiss by the time my sisters and I huffed in.

There was Thanksgiving dinner at Le Jules Verne, where I learned that turkey is highly over rated on that most American of holidays.

There was the car wreck in a torrential downpour set against the splendor of a brooding Chambord, beautiful and desolate in the slanted rain and fading light.

And there was my wine epiphany, in a wine cave somewhere in the Loire.

I don’t remember it being a planned stop, but pretty much everyone was ready to get out of the rental when we saw a sign advertising “Wine Tasting” on the side of the road.

It was cool and damp in the small, dimly lit cave.  As the host graciously poured us all a sample of chardonnay he described the wine, “pomme, poire…” trademarks of great Loire chardonnay, but it was the pear that jumped out to me. I had no idea up until that moment that Chardonnay could taste of anything other than vanilla, buttered popcorn and oak. But PEAR?! It was revolutionary, and I started my love affair with old world wine and French chardonnay then and there.

My dad bought a full case of the wine and each evening before dinner we would all gather to enjoy a glass.  I’m not sure how much ended up making it back home, but that no name wine changed the game for me.

I called my Dad to see if he could remember anything else and at first he didn’t recall the wine at all. Jules Verne, yes….the car wreck at Chambord, yes. As I described the wine it clicked. “Yes, I do remember buying a case of wine somewhere. It was definitely chardonnay, but I don’t remember anything about pear?”.

What wine changed the game for you?

cheers

(3) Comments

    • Thanks! I adore hearing other people’s wine origin stories:) Looking forward to writing about the wine that made me switch careers from politics to wine, especially since I was able to finally visit in person last summer!

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